Dubmorphology

Dubmorphology

Dubmorphology   DUBMORPHOLOGY Interview Pervaiz Khan: How did you end up working together? Gary Stewart: I enjoy Trevor’s thirst for creative adventure and exploration. What I liked about him when I first met him was his inclination not to use any (musical) beats. It was fascinating and ethereal; a montage, a bricolage of audioscapes.I think he should embrace it even more. It was absolutely mesmerising and still is. Trevor Mathison: I really like Gary’s way of working, he makes it easier for me to do what I like doing, we have a complimentary practice. GS: There’s a on-going and energising critical engagement between us. Trevor does not like everything I do. But I respect him, he makes it a safe environment. So if I say “Do you want to slow that down a bit or do you want to add something in a different way” he accommodates it. There aren’t many people you can safely do that with. Ani (Dr Das, ADF – Asian Dub Foundation) is the only other person I feel can do that with. TM: Gary introduces me to new ideas “Check this or have you heard this” opening new avenues, expanding my worldview. GS: We’ve been working together for eleven years, but I have been a fan since Signs of Empire (1982-84 Black Audi Film Collective). TM: We met in Birmingham 1989 and then again in Islington (North London). GS: Oh yeh at the rave at Union Chapel (North London). TM: And then in 1993 at ARTEC (Arts Technology Centre) in Islington. I was amazed you could make cd’s there. Mad sessions of making Cd’s,...
Afrocartography

Afrocartography

Afrocartography: Traces of Places and all points in between – a choreopoem Mwenya B. Kabwe This is a story of migratory proportions and the travels take place in the timeless, surreal space of dreams. The Traveler and her other selves (The Afropolitan, The Afrosettler and The Mapmaker) forge new paths, re-visit engrained routes and imagine a world where contradiction, uncertainty and complexity are the norm. It is an invitation to visit an in-between realm of existence where dreaming, waking, memory and imagination overlap. The heightened text and stylized movement speak of travel, ritual, always belonging and never belonging. The traveler’s journey into a fantastical world of ‘places’ to encounter characters who are from history and from next door, with stopovers in The Black Place of Fables, The Red Place of Conjuring and The Green Place of Letters. Afrocartography is an autobiographical choreopoem. Its first written iteration was produced in Cape Town, South Africa in 2007 in response to the complexities of living and working in the city as a non-South African migrant of Zambian and Zimbabwean extraction. The production itself, as itinerant as its title suggests, has had showings at the Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town in 2007; the UNESCO World Festival of Theatre Schools in Barcelona in 2008; at the Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) symposium on Knowledge and Transformation in Stellenbosch in 2008; at the opening of the Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts (GIPCA) in Cape Town, 2009; and as part of the live performance programme of GIPCA’s Exuberance Project in Cape Town in 2012. It has also been performed at the Wits Theatre in...
Village Main (1888 – )

Village Main (1888 – )

Village Main (1888 – ) Bettina Malcomess My history with the site of the former Village Main Mine, just visible alongside the M2 highway, as the Joe Slovo onramp merges with the motorway heading West, begins as a student at Wits University in the mid 1990’s. Passing the head-gear of the mine on a daily basis, I was always fascinated by this marker of the city’s mining history. Around 2010, the headgear suddenly disappeared. Since 2008, Dorothee Kreutzfeldt and I had been working on our book, Not No Place – Johannesburg, Fragments of Spaces and Times (Jacana, 2013) and had been documenting sites along the mining belt, including the Top Star Drive-In, which was also in the process of being re-mined. Over the course of our 6 years of research on the city, we would visit the site of the Village Main on several occasions. After the completion of Not No Place, I would again return periodically to the site over the course of 2 years of fieldwork for the book project, Routes and Rites to the City: Mobility, Diversity and Religious Space in the Johannesburg. Here I worked with researchers, Melekias Zulu, Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon, Peter Kankonde Bukasa and Lorena Núñez Carrasco and the project was based in the African Centre for Migration and Society at Wits (ACMS). What is at question here is the temporality and history my relationship to this site produced by these two very different collaborations, where the role of writer, artist and researcher were in some ways interchangeable. The title of Not No Place is strongly tied to this site, a photograph of which...
corner loving

corner loving

corner loving MADEYOULOOK About MADEYOULOOK MADEYOULOOK is an inter-disciplinary artist collaboration made up of Molemo Moiloa and Nare Mokgotho. The works of MADEYOULOOK often reference everyday innovations; aspects of inner-city life that find simple solutions to ordinary challenges. Related to this is MADEYOULOOK’s broader interest in art’s relation to audience, concepts of publics, notions of knowledge production and access to ownership in the wider sense. MADEYOULOOK is responsible for various projects over the past 6 years including Sermon on a Train, Extra Extra and Wish You Were Here, among others. Peer Review Annie Paul MADEYOULOOK.zip: Corner Loving Made you look at how lovers gravitate towards public spaces where they can be out of sight to the extent that this is possible. How to be private in public. O let not our intimacy attract too much attention. Fascinating project that ranges from the architectural to the anthropological via the politics of space in vernacular culture. From the remote colonial ethnography of “Married Life in an African Tribe” to the most sophisticated use of the cultural studies paradigm: a study of letter writing amongst migrant workers on the Witwatersrand before World War II that tries to answer the question “Was there a private sphere among the southern African rural poor before Apartheid?” “At the outset, then, we can observe a fairly straightforward confrontation between marriage shaped by the concerns of kinship and the public negotiations of the extended family, and courtship organized by individual desire and the private love-letter. ‘How,’ to restate Justice Nhlapo’s question, ‘do you command your daughter to marry a man of your choice when a missionary education...
XENOS

XENOS

XENOS Jyoti Mistry, director Fred Nordström, cinematographer; Chris Letcher, composer XENOS was originally intended as a triptych installation consisting of three short films screened simultaneously with a single soundtrack. The piece explores various themes of foreignness and invites the question of time across geographical spaces to consider the “alien” or “exotic,” and how over time what is foreign comes to be assimilated and made “natural.” In the version adapted for this journal the three films can be streamed separately in any order, and the musical score has been reworked from the original.   Xenos 1 explores the idea of botanical histories and looks at the introduction of Jacaranda Trees to South Africa from Brazil. Over the last 100 years these trees have been “naturalized” to the arid South African high-veld and are considered part of the geography of the landscape. They form an indelible part of South African identity. Xenos 2 reflects on the bionic evolution of human form with references to cyborg theory as a way of exploring human possibilities for the future. Xenos 3 considers the relationship between language and the ability for humans to create modes of expression that signify a desire to mark their existence. This sequence, filmed at the Cradle of Humankind in South Africa, is an expression of various languages and its significance in describing human experience. In a bid to reveal aspects of the production processes in the creation of the work we include a link to a discussion by cinematographer Fred Nordström who reflects on his collaboration with director Jyoti Mistry on the project. And below is a conversation between Mistry...